Copyright 2018 by Andrew Reid - BendTrack    All Rights reserved    E-Mail: andrew@bendtrack.com
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The BendTrack Manual  --  Adaptor Modules
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          In this part of the manual we'll be taking a look at what we call "Adapter" or "Conversion" modules. With the use of these  
adapter modules the flexibility of both Bend Track and N-Trak is increased above either system's flexibility by itself. As the name  
suggests these special modules will allow the use of both systems in the same layout. For example, this would permit a club who  
has an N-Trak system in use and who would be reluctant to pick up and start over, to simply decide on one or more of these  
conversion modules. Therefore, with a little bit of construction and wiring, they would have increased the options to the members  
in the variety of modules that could be built. The biggest benefit of doing this is that the two systems each have certain strengths  
which compliment each other very nicely.
Combining BendTrack and N-Trak
Adaptor Modules
          The wiring for this adapter is very straight forward. Even though the module has connection points for two different sets of standards, the basic electrical conventions of the two systems are very similar. Just follow the appropriate wiring specifications that each system (BendTrack or N-Trak) uses and apply them to the appropriate ends of the adapters. You'll notice bus lines feeding mainlines 1 and 2 will each wind up having two differing color codes on the Cinch-Jones plugs. This happens because BendTrack uses different colors to identify it's mainlines 1 and 2 than what N-Trak uses. Also take note of the gender of the plugs. Again, following the wiring specifications of the appropriate standard for each of the three ends of the module will ensure the proper plugs are located correctly.
          The length between the N-Trak ends would most conveniently be built to 6 or 8 feet to work most easily in an N-Trak layout, as those are both standard N-Trak module lengths.

          The shortest possible length for this adapter would be 4 feet 10 inches if the minimum radius and other standards of Bend Track were used and no diamonds were used for bypassing trains. This would require a "Bridge" module of equal length to be used on the opposite side of the layout to keep everything in balance since 4 feet 10 inches is not a standard length in N-Trak. Main 2 could use medium turnouts to allow it to bypass the Bend Track section and still fit in the 4 foot 10 inch length.
          One last point to mention about this adapter is that it could also be built to replace an N-Trak outside corner module instead of a straight. In this case the shank and one wing of the "T" are made to N-Trak standards while the remaining wing is made to Bend Track standards. The wiring would follow the same principle of using each end's color codes and plug gender arrangement for the type of module that is to connect to it.

          As pictured, the adapter replaces a standard 4 foot N-Trak corner module but the same basic design could also replace the smaller 3 foot standard corner. If so, the outline of the module will be shaped not straight like the above-left drawing, but like an N-Trak corner module superimposed on a Bend Track "offset straight" module shown above-right. Several groups have built these, some even utilizing curved bench work to blend the outline of the module between the three non-aligned ends, creating an almost fluid transition between modular standards. Beautiful!
N-Trak to Bend Track Adaptor
          The first type of adapter is ideally suited to a club who has an existing N-Trak system and would like to add BendTrack to it. It is similar to a Bend Track "T" in that the shank of the "T" ends with Bend Track standards but now the two wings of the "T" end with N-Trak standards. N-Trak mainlines 1 and 2 swing from the wings to the shank to become Bend Track mainlines 1 and 2. N-Trak's branch line (track 3) runs across from one wing to the other without diverting to the shank of the "T".

          Obviously this design requires all trains on mainlines 1 and 2 to travel all of both types of modules. If desired, various arrangements of crossovers, diamonds, and sidings can allow all trains to remain on the N-Trak sections of the layout. Block controls may be needed to permit the crossing over of the trains through these cut-offs depending on the particular arrangement, but those can be worked out at the building clubs discretion.
The Original "N"ovative Modular System
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          In this part of the manual we'll be taking a look at what we call "Adapter" or  
"Conversion" modules. With the use of these adapter modules the flexibility of both Bend  
Track and N-Trak is increased above either system's flexibility by itself. As the name  
suggests these special modules will allow the use of both systems in the same layout. For  
example, this would permit a club who has an N-Trak system in use and who would be  
reluctant to pick up and start over, to simply decide on one or more of these conversion  
modules. Therefore, with a little bit of construction and wiring, they would have increased  
the options to the members in the variety of modules that could be built. The biggest  
benefit of doing this is that the two systems each have certain strengths which  
compliment each other very nicely.
          In this part of the manual we'll be taking a look at what we call "Adapter" or  
"Conversion" modules. With the use of these adapter modules the flexibility of both Bend  
Track and N-Trak is increased above either system's flexibility by itself. As the name  
suggests these special modules will allow the use of both systems in the same layout. For  
example, this would permit a club who has an N-Trak system in use and who would be  
reluctant to pick up and start over, to simply decide on one or more of these conversion  
modules. Therefore, with a little bit of construction and wiring, they would have increased  
the options to the members in the variety of modules that could be built. The biggest  
benefit of doing this is that the two systems each have certain strengths which  
compliment each other very nicely.
          The first type of adapter is ideally suited to a club who has an existing N-Trak system and would like to add BendTrack to it. It is similar to a Bend Track "T" in that the shank of the "T" ends with Bend Track standards but now the two wings of the "T" end with N-Trak standards. N-Trak mainlines 1 and 2 swing from the wings to the shank to become Bend Track mainlines 1 and 2. N-Trak's branch line (track 3) runs across from one wing to the other without diverting to the shank of the "T".

          Obviously this design requires all trains on mainlines 1 and 2 to travel all of both types of modules. If desired, various arrangements of crossovers, diamonds, and sidings can allow all trains to remain on the N-Trak sections of the layout. Block controls may be needed to permit the crossing over of the trains through these cut-offs depending on the particular arrangement, but those can be worked out at the building clubs discretion.
          The wiring for this adapter is very straight forward. Even though the module has connection points for two different sets of standards, the basic electrical conventions of the two systems are very similar. Just follow the appropriate wiring specifications that each system (BendTrack or N-Trak) uses and apply them to the appropriate ends of the adapters. You'll notice bus lines feeding mainlines 1 and 2 will each wind up having two differing color codes on the Cinch-Jones plugs. This happens because BendTrack uses different colors to identify it's mainlines 1 and 2 than what N-Trak uses. Also take note of the gender of the plugs. Again, following the wiring specifications of the appropriate standard for each of the three ends of the module will ensure the proper plugs are located correctly.
          The length between the N-Trak ends would most conveniently be built to 6 or 8 feet to work most easily in an N-Trak layout, as those are both standard N-Trak module lengths.

          The shortest possible length for this adapter would be 4 feet 10 inches if the minimum radius and other standards of Bend Track were used and no diamonds were used for bypassing trains. This would require a "Bridge" module of equal length to be used on the opposite side of the layout to keep everything in balance since 4 feet 10 inches is not a standard length in N-Trak. Main 2 could use medium turnouts to allow it to bypass the Bend Track section and still fit in the 4 foot 10 inch length.
          One last point to mention about this adapter is that it could also be built to replace an N-Trak outside corner module instead of a straight. In this case the shank and one wing of the "T" are made to N-Trak standards while the remaining wing is made to Bend Track standards. The wiring would follow the same principle of using each end's color codes and plug gender arrangement for the type of module that is to connect to it.

          As pictured, the adapter replaces a standard 4 foot N-Trak corner module but the same basic design could also replace the smaller 3 foot standard corner. If so, the outline of the module will be shaped not straight like the above-left drawing, but like an N-Trak corner module superimposed on a Bend Track "offset straight" module shown above-right. Several groups have built these, some even utilizing curved bench work to blend the outline of the module between the three non-aligned ends, creating an almost fluid transition between modular standards. Beautiful!
The Original "N"ovative
Modular System
Manual Navigation
Combining BendTrack & N-Trak
          In this part of the manual we'll be  
taking a look at what we call "Adapter" or  
"Conversion" modules. With the use of  
these adapter modules the flexibility of both  
Bend Track and N-Trak is increased above  
either system's flexibility by itself. As the  
name suggests these special modules will  
allow the use of both systems in the same  
layout. For example, this would permit a  
club who has an N-Trak system in use and  
who would be reluctant to pick up and start  
over, to simply decide on one or more of  
these conversion modules. Therefore, with  
a little bit of construction and wiring, they  
would have increased the options to the  
members in the variety of modules that  
could be built. The biggest benefit of doing  
this is that the two systems each have  
certain strengths which compliment each  
other very nicely.
          The first type of adapter is ideally suited to a club who has an existing N-Trak system and would like to add BendTrack to it. It is similar to a Bend Track "T" in that the shank of the "T" ends with Bend Track standards but now the two wings of the "T" end with N-Trak standards. N-Trak mainlines 1 and 2 swing from the wings to the shank to become Bend Track mainlines 1 and 2. N-Trak's branch line (track 3) runs across from one wing to the other without diverting to the shank of the "T".

          Obviously this design requires all trains on mainlines 1 and 2 to travel all of both types of modules. If desired, various arrangements of crossovers, diamonds, and sidings can allow all trains to remain on the N-Trak sections of the layout. Block controls may be needed to permit the crossing over of the trains through these cut-offs depending on the particular arrangement, but those can be worked out at the building clubs discretion.
          The wiring for this adapter is very straight forward. Even though the module has connection points for two different sets of standards, the basic electrical conventions of the two systems are very similar. Just follow the appropriate wiring specifications that each system (BendTrack or N-Trak) uses and apply them to the appropriate ends of the adapters. You'll notice bus lines feeding mainlines 1 and 2 will each wind up having two differing color codes on the Cinch-Jones plugs. This happens because BendTrack uses different colors to identify it's mainlines 1 and 2 than what N-Trak uses. Also take note of the gender of the plugs. Again, following the wiring specifications of the appropriate standard for each of the three ends of the module will ensure the proper plugs are located correctly.
          The length between the N-Trak ends would most conveniently be built to 6 or 8 feet to work most easily in an N-Trak layout, as those are both standard N-Trak module lengths.

          The shortest possible length for this adapter would be 4 feet 10 inches if the minimum radius and other standards of Bend Track were used and no diamonds were used for bypassing trains. This would require a "Bridge" module of equal length to be used on the opposite side of the layout to keep everything in balance since 4 feet 10 inches is not a standard length in N-Trak. Main 2 could use medium turnouts to allow it to bypass the Bend Track section and still fit in the 4 foot 10 inch length.
Copyright 2018 by Andrew Reid - BendTrack
All Rights reserved
E-Mail: andrew@bendtrack.com
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