Copyright 2018 by Andrew Reid - BendTrack    All Rights reserved    E-Mail: andrew@bendtrack.com
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The BendTrack Manual  --  Benchwork Standards
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          There are many construction methods that might seem suitable for module construction, however, it has been our
experience that only a couple stand up to the rigors of module transport and assembly. Module frames should be made from
either nominal 1 x 4 pine lumber or plywood cut into similarly sized strips. Depending on the length & width of the module, as well
as the bracing in the frame, 1/2" or 5/8" plywood should be used for the framework. 1/2" plywood is suggested to be secured to
the top of the framework. Therefore the overall height would be a minimum standard of 4".

          While 1/2" plywood is recommended for rigidity, homosote, suspended ceiling tile, or rigid insulation foam can also be
used to reduce the weight of the module. If such material is used for the top, the framework should then be made more sturdy
and the lightweight top material should sit down into the frame so the soft edge will not be exposed to damage.
The Module Frame & Top
          Legs should be built to a length which allows the modules to adjust to
a standard rail height of 50" on uneven floors. However, you may choose
any height which fits your needs. This height (50") was selected to give a
more realistic vantage point for viewing the modules and has received
quite a few compliments from the viewing public, some people saying that
they felt they became much more a part of the scene.

          We have found that legs built in an "L" shaped configuration made
from 3/4" lumber seem to work best. The "L" shape eliminates the warping
effect that is a problem with legs that have been made by ripping a 2 x 4 in
half. A block of hard wood cut to a size of 2 1/2" long x 1 1/4" square with a
hole drilled clear through the length will allow a carriage bolt to thread
through for leveling. This block should then be glued and nailed flush with
the bottom of the leg. Be careful not to drive a nail through the hole in the
hardwood block. A "T" nut (5/16" x 20 preferred) and no less than 9/16"
threaded shaft should be driven into the hole. Then, threaded carriage bolts
with a length of 3" to 4" should be screwed into the bottom of the legs with 
1 1/2" exposed to serve as the levelers for the module. The rounded head
of the carriage bolt will prevent damage to flooring at shows, while still
allowing for easy adjustment.
          Using this standard 4" height will allow all modules to fit against one another neatly. If however, you wish to build a module with a scenery profile that is NOT totally flat across the end, you may of course do this, but you will have to allow a space under the mainlines in the bench work where C-clamps can go to attach to the next module. 2" to 3 1/2" C-clamps are required to connect and hold the modules together. Remember when designing your modules, that they will have to fit in your car, truck, or van for hauling purposes.
The Original "N"ovative Modular System
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          There are many construction methods that might seem suitable for module
construction, however, it has been our experience that only a couple stand up to the rigors
of module transport and assembly. Module frames should be made from either nominal 1
x 4 pine lumber or plywood cut into similarly sized strips. Depending on the length & width
of the module, as well as the bracing in the frame, 1/2" or 5/8" plywood should be used
for the framework. 1/2" plywood is suggested to be secured to the top of the framework.
Therefore the overall height would be a minimum standard of 4".

          While 1/2" plywood is recommended for rigidity, homosote, suspended ceiling tile,
or rigid insulation foam can also be used to reduce the weight of the module. If such
material is used for the top, the framework should then be made more sturdy and the
lightweight top material should sit down into the frame so the soft edge will not be
exposed to damage.
          We have found that legs built in an "L" shaped configuration made from 3/4" lumber
seem to work best. The "L" shape eliminates the warping effect that is a problem with
legs that have been made by ripping a 2 x 4 in half. A block of hard wood cut to a size of
2 1/2" long x 1 1/4" square with a hole drilled clear through the length will allow a carriage
bolt to thread through for leveling. This block should then be glued and nailed flush with
the bottom of the leg. Be careful not to drive a nail through the hole in the hardwood block.
A "T" nut (5/16" x 20 preferred) and no less than 9/16" threaded shaft should be driven
into the hole. Then, threaded carriage bolts with a length of 3" to 4" should be screwed
into the bottom of the legs with  1 1/2" exposed to serve as the levelers for the module.
The rounded head of the carriage bolt will prevent damage to flooring at shows, while still
allowing for easy adjustment.
          Legs should be built to a length which allows the modules to adjust to a standard rail height of 50" on uneven floors. However, you may choose any height which fits your needs. This height (50") was selected to give a more realistic vantage point for viewing the modules and has received quite a few compliments from the viewing public, some people saying that they felt they became much more a part of the scene.
The Original "N"ovative
Modular System
          There are many construction methods that might seem suitable for module construction, however, it has been our
experience that only a couple stand up to the rigors of module transport and assembly. Module frames should be made from
either nominal 1 x 4 pine lumber or plywood cut into similarly sized strips. Depending on the length & width of the module, as well
as the bracing in the frame, 1/2" or 5/8" plywood should be used for the framework. 1/2" plywood is suggested to be secured to
the top of the framework. Therefore the overall height would be a minimum standard of 4".

          While 1/2" plywood is recommended for rigidity, homosote, suspended ceiling tile, or rigid insulation foam can also be
used to reduce the weight of the module. If such material is used for the top, the framework should then be made more sturdy
and the lightweight top material should sit down into the frame so the soft edge will not be exposed to damage.
Manual Navigation
          There are many construction  
methods that might seem suitable for  
module construction, however, it has been  
our experience that only a couple stand up  
to the rigors of module transport and  
assembly. Module frames should be made  
from either nominal 1 x 4 pine lumber or  
plywood cut into similarly sized strips.  
Depending on the length & width of the  
module, as well as the bracing in the frame,  
1/2" or 5/8" plywood should be used for the  
framework. 1/2" plywood is suggested to  
be secured to the top of the framework.  
Therefore the overall height would be a  
minimum standard of 4".

          While 1/2" plywood is recommended  
for rigidity, homosote, suspended ceiling  
tile, or rigid insulation foam can also be  
used to reduce the weight of the module. If  
such material is used for the top, the  
framework should then be made more  
sturdy and the lightweight top material  
should sit down into the frame so the soft  
edge will not be exposed to damage.
          Using this standard 4" height will allow all modules to fit against one another neatly. If however, you wish to build a module with a scenery profile that is NOT totally flat across the end, you may of course do this, but you will have to allow a space under the mainlines in the bench work where C-clamps can go to attach to the next module. 2" to 3 1/2" C-clamps are required to connect and hold the modules together. Remember when designing your modules, that they will have to fit in your car, truck, or van for hauling purposes.
          Legs should be built to a length which  
allows the modules to adjust to a standard  
rail height of 50" on uneven floors.  
However, you may choose any height  
which fits your needs. This height (50") was  
selected to give a more realistic vantage  
point for viewing the modules and has  
received quite a few compliments from the  
viewing public, some people saying that  
they felt they became much more a part of  
the scene.

          We have found that legs built in an  
"L" shaped configuration made from 3/4"  
lumber seem to work best. The "L" shape  
eliminates the warping effect that is a  
problem with legs that have been made by  
ripping a 2 x 4 in half. A block of hard wood  
cut to a size of 2 1/2" long x 1 1/4" square  
with a hole drilled clear through the length  
will allow a carriage bolt to thread through  
for leveling. This block should then be  
glued and nailed flush with the bottom of  
the leg. Be careful not to drive a nail  
through the hole in the hardwood block. A  
"T" nut (5/16" x 20 preferred) and no less  
than 9/16" threaded shaft should be driven  
into the hole. Then, threaded carriage bolts  
with a length of 3" to 4" should be screwed  
into the bottom of the legs with  1 1/2"  
exposed to serve as the levelers for the  
module. The rounded head of the carriage  
bolt will prevent damage to flooring at  
shows, while still allowing for easy  
adjustment.
          Now take the two legs and glue and screw lateral bracing members (made of strips of solid wood or plywood) up from the bottom a distance of 6" and 36" (for modules with a 50" rail height). This will create a "paired leg" that can not wobble from side to side.

          Do not attach the paired legs directly to the module end. The head of the bolt used to attach the legs will protrude on the outer surface of the end and will not allow the modules to clamp together tightly. This will produce a gap that can not be easily spanned. Instead, these paired legs will eventually bolt to "spandrels" within the module bench work.
Copyright 2018 by Andrew Reid - BendTrack
All Rights reserved
E-Mail: andrew@bendtrack.com
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Module Legs
          Now take the two legs and glue and screw lateral bracing members (made of strips of solid wood or plywood) up from the bottom a distance of 6" and 36" (for modules with a 50" rail height). This will create a "paired leg" that can not wobble from side to side.

          Do not attach the paired legs directly to the module end. The head of the bolt used to attach the legs will protrude on the outer surface of the end and will not allow the modules to clamp together tightly. This will produce a gap that can not be easily spanned. Instead, these paired legs will eventually bolt to "spandrels" within the module bench work.